Burns Night with forward2me...

a738e7d82161b0d32b6251e8b2f7b410.jpg

Burns Night

No, Burns Night isn't a horror sequel to a firework disaster movie. It's much stranger than that...It's a night (25 January) when people come together to celebrate the life and work of a Scottish poet by stabbing and eating sheep's intestines and getting very, very drunk. Well that's what happens round our way, anyway. I had the dubious good fortune  of living in both the towns where Burns was born and died and when I was young, there seemed to be no escape from the bard. I once won a prize for a rendition of a Burns poem, even though I'm technically a cockney and didn't have a clue what the words really meant...

So what is all the fuss about? As I get older, the poems start to make more sense. Some are funny, some are deep and romantic. They have a timeless quality and well, there are worse national heroes. The internet is a wonderful thing as there are many sites that offer translations from the Scots if you don't know yer erse from yer elbuck.

If you're planning to celebrate Burns Night, are you ready? You might want to add a Scottish tinge to the proceedings using some tartan decorations, table napkins etc. I don't think we can ship haggis but we can probably ship some other delicacies like shortbread, whisky and of course, tartan. Just use our door-to-door tracked delivery for a wee bit of change oot ae yer sporran and the bard will be with you in spirit.

I once had the pleasure of having haggis (vegetarian) piped in by proper bagpipes when I lived in a tiny terraced house. To recreate the effect, assemble as many members of your family as you can and get them to hum loudly whilst pinching their noses and tapping on their windpipes. Stand as close to them as you can. Perfect...

So. To make a complete Burns Night, it's a good idea to have plenty on offer to eat. A starter might be some Scottish salmon on oatmeal biscuits or tattie scones, or a Scottish cheese. The main course is, of course, the Haggis. This is piped in (or see above) and is usually accompanied by chappit neeps and tatties (mashed turnips/swede and potatoes). For a delicious desert, you can't go wrong with cranachan or some atholl brose. There should be poetry from Burns in as good a Scottish accent as you can muster, in particular, 'To a Haggis'. If you want a really comedic effect, intersperse the Burns with some McGonnagall. His poems bring tears to the eyes for all the wrong reasons...

Please just check the import restrictions for your country of residence before ordering spirits and food items. Ask our customer services department if you need any help putting your kilt on with your order.

Enjoy!

 

This site uses some unobtrusive cookies to store information on your computer. I agree